Tag Archives

Everyone Has a Story

This week as I was shopping at the grocery store, I stopped for a few minutes to talk with the lady giving out samples of chocolate milk. Though the course of our conversation, I learned that she grew up as a tomboy, was a cheerleader in high school, had a brother who was once an Olympic hopeful, had been married to a pro-football player,

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Picture Books for Christmas

A friend of mine told me about a holiday tradition she started when her children were very small. Each year, she would purchase one new picture book about Christmas to add to their collection, and each year they had one more to read. Now that her oldest is a teenager, they have a lot of special books to share, and a lot of special

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Studying the Slithery

About a week ago, my youngest found a small snake in our yard. In our area, snakes are beginning to hibernate as the colder weather sets in, so it was an unusual find. After looking closely at our snake, we realized it was a harmless hognose, naturally prompting a snake study at my house. We found a lot of great resources online, and there’s

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Twisters!

The past few days, our part of the country has seen some heavy rain and been under some unusual storm warnings. Radio and television newscasters have reported tornadoes touching down, a very strange occurrence for where we live. Fortunately, the damage was minimal. Thinking like homeschoolers, however, we were able to turn this newsworthy event into a starting point for a school lesson. We

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Science You Can Eat

Hands-on science projects involve questioning, observing, experimenting, and recording. While you may think you need a science lab or laboratory equipment to conduct a successful science experiment, think again — there are many things you can do in your own kitchen with items from the grocery store and common cooking utensils! In Science Experiments You Can Eat, author Vicki Cobb points out that cooking

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Novel-Writing for Kids and Teens

For many writers, the month of November is synonymous with NaNoWriMo, a shortened form of National Novel Writing Month. Would-be authors ages 13 and older can go to NaNoWriMo.org to sign on to write a 50,000-word novel in just 30 days. But NaNoWriMo isn’t only for adults and teens; younger writers can also accept the challenge. The NaNoWriMo’s Young Writer’s Program (http://ywp.nanowrimo.org/) is designed

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The Reason for a Flower

If you’re looking for a good starting place for a unit study about plants for your elementary students, The Reason for a Flower by Ruth Heller is a picture book worth checking out. Although this book contains a minimal amount of text, the text it does have introduces the students to many different aspects of plant life, including pollen and pollination; the parts of

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WriteShop

This past week we started back with our co-op classes. This year, I’m teaching a middle school/early high school creative writing class, using WriteShop for our curriculum. WriteShop was designed by homeschooling moms who loved to write and wanted their children to love to write, too. When they didn’t find a course to suit their needs, they designed one themselves, creating a two- (or

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Lunchtime Read-Alouds

Unless we’re running a lot of errands, most days we’re home at lunchtime — one of our favorite times to read together. It’s become a fun time to share a book, especially since my children all have different bedtimes, and finding a good time to read together in the evening can be difficult. Once everyone’s lunch is ready, I pick up a longer book

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Summer Reading for Older Students

Finding books for your middle school student or young adult can sometimes be difficult, as the content in some of the books may not be a good fit for your family. Authors of works for older kids will often try to “push the envelope” by including scenes or language you might feel are inappropriate for your children to read. How then, do you find

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