Tag Archives

Six Traits of Writing

If you are homeschooling an elementary grade or older child, the six traits of writing are a must to add to your Literature or Writing curriculum. It’s an easy to follow model to ensure that your child’s writing is gaining strength in the right areas. We are going over each slowly and one at time, building one upon the other. This writing model was

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Tongue Twisters

My kid’s pronunciation skills are challenged as they get older.  In an effort to help my son in particular and to have a little fun, we have started doing some tongue twisters. They help him exercise his tongue and slowly build up his diction and phonetics. Tongue twisters are a great speech therapy activity for lisps and stammers. We have been using the following

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Enriching your Child’s Environment

Sometimes when we are out and about, my son will see something he likes- not a toy or a game.  It’s a rock or a piece of bark.  He picks it up and takes it home.  It’s a habit he started as a toddler. My first instinct was to stop him, my mother’s voice in my head,”don’t touch – it’s dirty!”. What I remember

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‘Tis the Season — To Journal!

Many homeschooling methods, such as Charlotte Mason, recommend including nature journaling as a daily or weekly exercise for students. One of the best parts of nature journaling, however, is that it’s an activity for any age, from the very young to adults. Nature journaling involves recording in a notebook what you see, hear, feel, and experience when out in the natural world. It can

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Kids Know Best! – Children’s Book Review Sites

The libraries are full of children’s books — some good, some not so good. It can sometimes be overwhelming to try to find the right books for your family. Unless you have time to peruse them all before you check out, you may (like me) find yourself at home with several books that just weren’t a good choice. But there is a better way

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Schooling During Spring Break

If you’re like me and you’ve found yourself a little behind in your school calendar, you might choose to have your students continue working through Spring Break. It can be difficult to do, though, if friends or family members have the time off and want to get together. You can make Spring Break both fun and educational, however. Here are a few ideas: Schedule

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Simple Saturdays | Weekly Fun-filled Activities

If you have children who love making crafts, take a look at Simple Saturdays. This site was created by children’s book author Debbie Gonzales. She offers a new craft, science experiment, math game, or magic trick for children every weekend. The way it’s set up is so simple and easy to use. On Fridays, check in for the “prep” post. You’ll find out what

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Geography with Postcards

Here’s an activity you can do with children of any age. It’s fun, educational, and it helps build relationships! With your child, make a list of all of your relatives and family friends who live in other cities or out-of-state. Write down their addresses on a piece of paper. Show your child how to write a friendly letter, and instruct him to write a

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Backyard Bird Studies | Homeschool

Spring seems to be just around the corner, as this past week has brought warmer weather and sunny days. We’ve found daffodils growing in our yard, buds on the dogwood trees, and songbirds — lots of them — in the trees, in the grass, and all around the house. If you have elementary students, consider doing a springtime unit study on the birds found

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Homeschooling Parents | Share Your Skills

About this time of year, many homeschoolers are beginning to plan for summer studies or the next school year. Our co-op is already beginning to form the 2010-2011 class schedules based on student interest and teacher availability. As you decide the subjects you want your children to study, you might consider sharing your own skills with others – and allowing them to share with

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