Tag Archives

Written by Children

We recently started reading the second installment of Eragon. A boy, a quest, a dragon, swords, fighting, courage etc. It is, so far, a great ride we are both enjoying tremendously.  As we do with most of our favorite books, I encourage that we do some research on the author, to learn about her or his vision, and find out what other books the

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Book Reports

The love of reading is alive and well in our house.  If we have a free moment, you will find us reading.  It used to be you’d find us together reading in a heap.  Now that my son is nine, he retreats to his special places to enjoy his books. To gather his comprehension, I always ask him to provide a summary after he

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Poetry-Haiku

Though I have been reading classical poetry to my son since he was a baby, this has slowly faded. Poetry is imperative reading. It’s a way for children to explore language and make connections between words and emotion. Poetry discussions can help a child develop critical thinking skills- deciphering text and intent can be a mysterious journey. It is how poetry can help the

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Everyone Has a Story

This week as I was shopping at the grocery store, I stopped for a few minutes to talk with the lady giving out samples of chocolate milk. Though the course of our conversation, I learned that she grew up as a tomboy, was a cheerleader in high school, had a brother who was once an Olympic hopeful, had been married to a pro-football player,

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‘Tis the Season — To Journal!

Many homeschooling methods, such as Charlotte Mason, recommend including nature journaling as a daily or weekly exercise for students. One of the best parts of nature journaling, however, is that it’s an activity for any age, from the very young to adults. Nature journaling involves recording in a notebook what you see, hear, feel, and experience when out in the natural world. It can

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Novel-Writing for Kids and Teens

For many writers, the month of November is synonymous with NaNoWriMo, a shortened form of National Novel Writing Month. Would-be authors ages 13 and older can go to NaNoWriMo.org to sign on to write a 50,000-word novel in just 30 days. But NaNoWriMo isn’t only for adults and teens; younger writers can also accept the challenge. The NaNoWriMo’s Young Writer’s Program (http://ywp.nanowrimo.org/) is designed

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Alpha-Phonics

As I’ve been working on teaching my six-year-old to read, we’ve had to try a number of different programs to find one that’s a good fit for him. I think we’ve finally found that program in Alpha-Phonics by Samuel L. Blumenfeld. Consisting of just one book, this primer is designed for teaching beginners of all ages in both a one-on-one setting as well as

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WriteShop

This past week we started back with our co-op classes. This year, I’m teaching a middle school/early high school creative writing class, using WriteShop for our curriculum. WriteShop was designed by homeschooling moms who loved to write and wanted their children to love to write, too. When they didn’t find a course to suit their needs, they designed one themselves, creating a two- (or

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Finding Classes for Homeschoolers

Our area has several homeschool email loops for announcements and opportunities. As the school year begins, I’ve seen a lot of posts for classes in art, music, sports, and other extracurricular activities, as well as classes in core subject areas that might be harder to teach at home, such as upper-level math classes and science courses with labs. If you are looking for outside

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Bringing the Past to the Present – Writing Oral Histories

For about three years, we visited an “adopted” grandmother in a nursing home. We didn’t know her before we started visiting; we just asked the activities director if there was someone that we could meet with once a week, someone without many family members or friends already coming to call. In the course of our visits, we started asking our new friend about her

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